Maxwell Grantly

Magical stories from an independent author

A Reader’s Verdict

Quayside Photograph Just recently, a sample of five hundred teachers ranked the top ten books that all children should read before leaving primary school. In case you missed the survey results, the top ten reads as follows:

  1. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
  2. Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian
  3. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  4. Matilda by Roald Dahl
  5. The Gruffalo by Julia Donaldson
  6. The Chronicles of Narnia by C S Lewis
  7. The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
  8. We’re Going on a Bear Hunt by Michael Rosen
  9. Dogger by Shirley Hughes
  10. Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

Do you have opinions on the books included in this list? Are there stories that you were surprised to see included or are there classics that you thought should have appeared in this list? It is always interesting to hear what others think and to learn the reasons behind their decisions. However, what do children think of the results of this survey? This BBC article summarises the verdict of 11-year-old Tom Lamb, from Shenfield in Essex. You may find his thoughts to be enlightening. For Tom, the big surprise is that the list does not include a single Harry Potter book.

“I really think they should have been on the list. I am on the last one now. I read it every night. I like the last one best, more than the other ones. “It’s called The Deathly Hallows. The other ones are more about school and stuff. This is about when he’s left school and it’s a lot more exciting.”

Do you have a verdict regarding the results of this teacher survey? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the “comments” section.

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2 thoughts on “A Reader’s Verdict

  1. Personally, I was surprised that “Peter Pan” didn’t make it into the top ten. That story seems to have all the elements of a perfect children’s tale: strong characters, lively humour, an engaging plot, beautiful imagination, classic lines and (most of all) a sense of endearing magic.

  2. An interesting list, including some my kids have read. They both love Roald Dahl. Maurice Sendak’s Where The Wild Things Are is just a wonderfully elegant use of the English language. But yes, there are several here I haven’t heard of. Harry Potter would be a good one on the list. Also, I could see “The Hobbit” by Tolkein on this list (if not the entire Lord of the Rings saga!) Also, what about some science fiction to give kids a sense of thinking about the future? Even 1984, The Time Machine, or something of that sort?

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