Maxwell Grantly

Magical stories from an independent author

Archive for the tag “books”

The Incredible Adventure of Fingers and Boston

Abandoned by his parents and forced by fate to work on the streets of New Babbage shining shoes, Edward Croydon (also known as “Fingers”) has to pick the pockets of rich gentlemen in order to survive. However, his life takes an unexpected turn of events when he discovers a stray Boston terrier wandering alone on the streets: a stray dog with the most peculiar-shaped dog tag hanging from her collar. Unfortunately, it’s not only Fingers who is interested in finding out the meaning of this curious dog tag; a gang of local criminals are searching for this dog and her tag too. They will do anything to seize the dog tag for themselves, within the Law or not.

Will Fingers find out the significance behind the strange-shaped dog tag of his new canine friend?

Will the local police be able to trace the missing Boston terrier before the criminals track Fingers and the lost dog?

Will the new friendship of Fingers and his terrier overcome the problems that they face together?

Find out the answer to these questions by reading the new picture storybook by Maxwell Grantly: “The Incredible Adventure of Fingers and Boston.”

The Incredible Adventure of Fingers and Boston

If you are interested in reading The Incredible Adventure of Fingers and Boston, it can be downloaded free of charge from Barnes & Noble, Blio, iBooks, Inktera, Kobo, Lulu and Smashwords. Sadly, the software at Amazon does not allow a zero pricing and so (if you use a Kindle) you may also download this story – but at a very small charge. Simply type “Maxwell Grantly” or “The Incredible Adventure of Fingers and Boston” into the search bar at any of these eight sites.

Advertisements

Jack and the Space Pirates

Jack lived and worked on EM-05, a steampunk space station found on a major trade route between Earth and Mars. He would spend his days tarring the insides of frigates and galleons, as they stopped for repairs and supplies, on their way to the distant planets of the Solar System. There were very few other children that worked on EM-05 and so it could get very lonely for Jack. However, he did have one close friend, an abandoned cat named Jet, and the two of them were inseparable.

Jack and Jet found that their lives were thrown into turmoil when a gang of space pirates stole a valuable galleon. The two friends were flung into an incredible adventure and Jack was forced to devise a cunning plan to return them both to their intergalactic home.

Jack and the Space Pirates is a beautifully produced children’s storybook, with lovely enchanting illustrations on every page.

Jack and the Space Pirates

If you are interested in reading Jack and the Space Pirates, it can be downloaded free of charge from Barnes & Noble, Blio, iBooks, Inktera, Kobo, Lulu and Smashwords. Sadly, the software at Amazon does not allow a zero pricing and so (if you use a Kindle) you may also download this story – but at a very small charge. Simply type “Maxwell Grantly” or “Jack and the Space Pirates” into the search bar at any of these eight sites.

Professor Nibbler’s Most Amazing Mouse Circus

This is the the start of a new free eBook, by Maxwell Grantly. You can find all Maxwell’s stories, free to download, on iTunes, Kobo, Lulu, Barnes & Noble and Smashwords. Professor Nibbler’s Most Amazing Mouse Circus will be available to download, free of charge, later this month.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Gobbler and the Mirror

Gobbler would spend his days searching for scraps of food to steal and, whenever he found some morsel, he would gobble it down quickly. It was for this reason that the other street urchins gave him his nickname.

One day Gobbler’s luck seemed to change when he spied an open door of a rich house and he sneaked inside to search for something to eat. However, he found himself stumbling upon a meeting of local businessmen and he accidentally discovered the announcement of an amazing new invention that would change his life forever.

Find out how Gobbler managed to eavesdrop on the most important scientific discovery in the history of New Babbage and what he found out.

Like all stories by Maxwell Grantly, all is not what it may seem to be.

This delightfully illustrated eBook for children is free to download from iTunes, Kobo and Smashwords.

gobbler-01

gobbler-02

gobbler-03

Pfaffenthal Update

Snapshot_099

Next year (2017) will be the 150th anniversary of the Second Treaty of London.

For people living outside Luxembourg, this date will have very little significance. However, for those who live and work in Luxembourg, the year 2017 will be an important opportunity to celebrate the reaffirmation of the neutrality of their city and a chance to remember the starting of a new chapter of this important European location.

The Second Treaty of London was an international treaty signed on 11 May 1867. It was agreed in the aftermath of the Austro-Prussian War and the Luxembourg Crisis and it had wide-reaching consequences for Luxembourg and for the relations between Europe’s Great Powers.

As part of the many celebrations planned for 2017, I am currently working with a team from across the whole of Europe; helping in the production of a transmedia comic strip set in a computer generated reconstruction of the 1867 city. The story revolves around a young Luxembourgish boy named Steft and it explains how his vivid imagination caused him to cross the paths of many different characters in and around his home city of Luxembourg.

If all goes to plan, the comic strip will be released some time next year and it is hoped that it may be a unique way of retelling the stories of the inhabitants of this important European City.

Children and eBooks

Snapshot_017.png

Surveys show that many adults prefer to access their reading material in a paper format. Children, however, are more open to using digital devices.

The use of eBooks is on the rise in schools, by children as young as three, and digital devices are making a large difference to the reading habits of boys in particular. The School Library Journal has reported that tablets or laptops are currently used in about two-thirds of schools across America, however their use is rather more sporadic in British schools. Over the past year, the National Literacy Trust has been conducting research into the impact of digital reading devices upon the literacy development of a sample of 800 children from 40 schools. Interestingly, in a period of just four months, boys made (on average) a progress of 8.4 months, compared to an average of 7.2 months among girls.

Researchers are now beginning new studies to try and discover why boys respond so well to digital media.

There is still a place for a wide range of different reading formats in both schools and the home but it is encouraging that, despite the reservations of adults towards the introduction of eBooks, many children flourish with the acquisition of sound literacy skills, using digital formats.

If your child is interested in using a tablet or laptop to access reading material, you may like to know that Maxwell Grantly has produced an exciting range of original reading material, all of which can be downloaded from Kobo and iTunes completely free of charge.

(Source of information: BBC website)

Child Literacy at Christmas

Have you seen the new Sainsbury’s Christmas Advert this year? Mog sets off a chain of unfortunate events that almost ruin Christmas for the Thomas family. Can she pull it all back to save the day?

This year, Sainsbury’s are working in partnership with HarperCollins Children’s Books and world renowned author/illustrator Judith Kerr to create a Christmas story based on her much loved character Mog.

If you enjoyed the video clip, you can buy the beautifully illustrated book from Sainsbury’s. Every penny of the profit from sales of the book will be donated to Save the Children, improving child literacy in the UK.

If you would like further inspiration for teaching children to read, you may also like to know that every story by Maxwell Grantly can be downloaded (completely free of charge) from both iBooks and Kobo. There is even a free special Christmas eBook planned for released in December – more news about that later this month.

A Merry Christmas to you all.

Recommended for November

Those of us who live in the northern hemisphere have put our clocks back and we are now looking forward to six months of winter. That means that many of us will be curling up by the fire, with a warm cup of cocoa in one hand and a good book in the other.

If you want a reading suggestion for your children (at no cost) you could browse through the large selection of free eBooks on iTunes and Kobo by Maxwell Grantly.

If you want an idea of where to start, why not try the first story in a trilogy about Fingers the Pickpocket, called “The Incredible Story of Fingers and Boston.”

The Incredible Adventure of Fingers and Boston

Abandoned by his parents and forced by fate to work on the streets of New Babbage shining shoes, Edward Croydon (also known as “Fingers”) has to pick the pockets of rich gentlemen in order to survive. However, his life takes an unexpected turn of events when he discovers a stray Boston terrier wandering alone on the streets: a stray dog with the most peculiar-shaped dog tag hanging from her collar. Unfortunately, it’s not only Fingers who is interested in finding out the meaning of this curious dog tag; a gang of local criminals are searching for this dog and her tag too. They will do anything to seize the dog tag for themselves, within the Law or not.
Will Fingers find out the significance behind the strange-shaped dog tag of his new canine friend?
Will the local police be able to trace the missing Boston terrier before the criminals track Fingers and the lost dog?
Will the new friendship of Fingers and his terrier overcome the problems that they face together?
Find out the answer to these questions by reading the picture storybook by Maxwell Grantly: “The Incredible Adventure of Fingers and Boston.”

Gobbler and the Mirror

Gobbler and the Mirror

We all know that light travels incredibly quickly in a vacuum. When it passes through other media, such as water or glass, it slows down very slightly. So, just imagine what life would be like if light travelled substantially slower in glass! How would such a world look?

Professor Higgins discovered that, if you added a special crystalline compound to the manufacture of glass, you could create a new transparent substance that had the property of slowing light by a total of three hours. Just imagine looking through a window that was made of this new invention: it would be like looking three hours into the past!

A local street urchin named Gobbler accidentally stumbled into a lecture given by Professor Higgins and learnt the secret behind this new amazing substance. His life would never be the same from that moment on. Find out how Gobbler’s life changed for the worse when he found himself being framed for a theft that he did not commit and discover whether he managed to clear his name.

Maxwell Grantly reveals all in his new eBook: “Gobbler and the Mirror.”

As is common with many stories by Maxwell, everything is not what it might at first seem to be!

Reading and Examination Progress

Jack Reading

Parents have longed guessed that, if their children spend a disproportionate amount of time on computer games or in front of the television, their children might fail to develop important academic and social skills. Today, a comprehensive study by researchers from Cambridge University was released. It verified that even an extra hour of “screen time” a day at Year 10 is linked to a significant poorer attainment at GCSE level.

More than 800 14 year-old students were followed for two years. It was found that those who spent an extra hour a day on computer games, the Internet and television saw a fall in their GCSE results, equivalent to dropping a grade in two subjects. Those who spent an extra two hours a day on these same activities saw a fall, equivalent to dropping a grade in four subjects.

More importantly, it also found that pupils who did an extra hour of homework or reading performed significantly better than their peers.

While common sense may explain how time spent on homework may boost students’ performance at GCSE level, it was interesting the note that the same effect was achieved by simply recreational reading too. This is the result that many parents may find the most surprising. Could it be that reading for pleasure assists students in the assimilation and processing of the written word: an important skill to acquire when tackling written examinations? Perhaps there could be other factors involved: students who are more academic are simply more likely to enjoy the written word. This would be a useful area of research to investigate further.

However, it can be inferred that time spent reading different forms of literature can be time well spent and it can have major benefits in the subsequent growth and development of young minds.

Post Navigation