Maxwell Grantly

Magical stories from an independent author

Archive for the tag “Games”

1867 Update

If you follow this blog, you will already know that I am currently working with a friend (cyberpiper) in the production of an authentic historical reproduction of 1867 Luxembourg, using the Roblox platform.

Using old photographs and other historical documents, cyberpiper and I are producing a realistic computer generation of how this part of Luxembourg would have looked in the mid-nineteenth century.

Pfaffenthal Image 01

If you are keen to see how the work in progress is faring, you are welcome to view the following video clip of a basic walk around the Rue des bons Malades. Cyberpiper and I are now working on buildings on the opposite side of the river, before proceeding to complete the section of the city beyond the church.

There is a great deal of work to do but you are welcome to visit what has been done so far, if you remain interested.

Click here for a link to the1867 game.

Can you recognise the location shown in this photograph, by visiting and playing the game?

Pfaffenthal Image 02

Ultimately, our aim is to produce a working game that may encourage gamers to enjoy and respect our amazing shared historical heritage.

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Reading and Examination Progress

Jack Reading

Parents have longed guessed that, if their children spend a disproportionate amount of time on computer games or in front of the television, their children might fail to develop important academic and social skills. Today, a comprehensive study by researchers from Cambridge University was released. It verified that even an extra hour of “screen time” a day at Year 10 is linked to a significant poorer attainment at GCSE level.

More than 800 14 year-old students were followed for two years. It was found that those who spent an extra hour a day on computer games, the Internet and television saw a fall in their GCSE results, equivalent to dropping a grade in two subjects. Those who spent an extra two hours a day on these same activities saw a fall, equivalent to dropping a grade in four subjects.

More importantly, it also found that pupils who did an extra hour of homework or reading performed significantly better than their peers.

While common sense may explain how time spent on homework may boost students’ performance at GCSE level, it was interesting the note that the same effect was achieved by simply recreational reading too. This is the result that many parents may find the most surprising. Could it be that reading for pleasure assists students in the assimilation and processing of the written word: an important skill to acquire when tackling written examinations? Perhaps there could be other factors involved: students who are more academic are simply more likely to enjoy the written word. This would be a useful area of research to investigate further.

However, it can be inferred that time spent reading different forms of literature can be time well spent and it can have major benefits in the subsequent growth and development of young minds.

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